How ProAPOD Fights To Keep Up With Microsoft

ProAPOD Real Estate Investment Software was originally developed in 2000 as an application for MS Excel 97 with VBA (Visual Basic for Applications). This is the MS code for it’s Office software and is used by software developers to create macros (functions) to do a number of tasks. ProAPOD, for example, uses macros to display a customized toolbar (the topic of our first discussion).

Although VBA coding is certainly no easy task, the options back in 2000 were plentiful. For example, we could hide the Excel toolbar and replace it with our own customized toolbar during the entire time the user had ProAPOD opened. This was a great benefit because when a user opened our software the only toolbar that mattered–our toolbar–was the only one displayed. So it was easy (and not confusing) for the user to access it.

This was the case through WIN XP versions.

Then along came the infamous Vista (which Microsoft, thankfully, replaced almost immediately with Windows 7). Nonetheless, what Microsoft did at this point was to change what Excel applications were permitted to do with VBA. Starting with Vista we were no longer permitted to use a macro that would replace the Excel toolbar (now called the “ribbon”) with our own customized toolbar. Instead, it now requires the user to click an “Add-Ins” tab on the ribbon to display our ProAPOD toolbar within the ribbon. This not only has been a source of confusion for users, it has necessitated the extra burden of providing additional support files for the customer. Okay, fair enough.

But another result of the “ribbon” concerns one of our features. Prior to Vista we could call Print Preview in a manner that, to the user, would appear almost seamless. This was done with VBA by using the “ScreenUpdating” function.  With Vista and Windows 7, however, that function has to be removed from the macro to avoid other issues caused by the ribbon. Though the fix is an (albeit) acceptable solution, opening and closing Print Preview no longer appears as seamless as before (there is a slight flicker) .

When confronted by this issue, I was faced with two options: (1) remove the Print Preview feature altogether, or (2) make the modification to the code and accept the slightly-less-than-desirable (at least to me) result. At the end of the day we decided to make the modification and accept the result; considering that the Print Preview feature better serves the customer (warts and all) than not. Surprisingly, though, and just so you know, there were some who advised otherwise because they don’t consider previewing reports before printing a necessity.

The point of all of this is simply to say that Microsoft keeps moving the goal posts, and ProAPOD real estate investing software must continue to adjust. It’s not always easy, and we sometimes get unfairly blamed by customers for the added burden placed upon them by Microsoft. But we are committed to our software, and committed to our customers, and therefore we will continue the fight to keep up.

Navigating Closing Costs and the 1031 Tax Deferred Exchange

Navigating Closing Costs and the 1031 Tax Deferred Exchange

When entering into a 1031 exchange one often does not consider the ancillary costs that come with closing the transaction. Often the assumption is made that these costs will be subsidized by the 1031 exchange proceeds. However, while some of these costs certainly can be bankrolled by the tax deferred exchange, some cannot. Knowing how to avoid these expenses being deemed boot can keep your transaction out of hot water.

 

 

It is generally acknowledged that “payment of brokerage commissions from exchange proceeds does not create taxable boot.” Thus, payment of these “non-recurring” costs of sale or purchase from the exchange proceeds should not be considered taxable boot. Brokerage commissions are one example of non-recurring costs; however certain other costs are excluded.

 

They are as follows:

 

 

Real Estate Commissions

Recording Fees

Direct Legal Fees

Title Insurance Premiums

Qualified Intermediary Fees

Agreed Property Inspections

Escrow or Closing Agent Fees

Documentary Transfer Fees

 

 

Note: Expenses have to be customary in the jurisdiction (e.g. 6% listing agreement).

 

Certain costs are generally not covered and considered taxable boot if they are involved with anything else besides acquisition of the replacement property. The issue most people run into involves getting a new loan on the replacement property. Because the costs for acquiring the new loan are not related to the acquisition of the replacement property (according to the IRS), they are considered taxable boot. 

 

These Include:

 

Loan Fees

Points

Prorated Mortgage Insurance

 

Another issue to consider is that prorated property taxes, insurance payments and rents are considered deductible ongoing expenses. As such, they are not included in the 1031 exchange; however, their payment does not impact the use of the Qualified Intermediary safe harbor.  

 

James’ responsibilities include serving as the primary point of contact for affluent and institutional clients. James works closely with a team of experienced advisors to offer customized exchange solutions. Prior to founding ES Group, James served as the Mid-Atlantic Regional Manager for two of the leading National 1031 Exchange Qualified Intermediaries, where he was responsible for assisting real estate investors, accountants, attorneys, REITs, and private equity groups with executing like-kind exchange transactions.

Find More Tax Exchange Articles

A Beginner’s Guide To Real Estate Investing

A Beginner’s Guide To Real Estate Investing

       Property, of course, is anything and everything that can be owned.  Real estate property, in particular, is defined as land and all of the physical and man-made developments that are permanently associated and attached to it. This includes not only the ground itself and all that is connected to it, but the air above it and the minerals below it as well as all rights associated therewith.  All property not defined as real estate is personal property.

 

With the ownership of real estate comes not only the possession of the physical  property and the features that define it, but also the addition of certain legal rights to continuously enjoy the peaceful usage and redistribution of it.  What that means is that when we acquire ownership of real estate property, we also get an accompanying package of claims on the property.  These claims relate to the use, possession, control, enjoyment, exclusion, and distribution of the property, including the right to pass ownership along by way of a will.  Together, these rights change the definition of real estate to real property.

 

Over the course of time, the ownership and control of real estate has very much become a central part of our lives.  We rely on real property to feed, clothe and provide us with shelter.  In the United States and other highly developed countries,  these basic needs are met in a variety of ways.  As a result of the many technological inventions that have advanced our living standards, people are no longer directly dependent on owning land to meet their essential needs.  Instead, we rent or own apartments or houses that are serviced by utility companies and financed by lending institutions.  We work in office buildings, manufacturing plants and  shops and purchase the products and services we need from stores, play in parks and consume the meat and crops that comes to us from distant farms and ranches.

 

Many people now have the financial means to proceed beyond the use of real estate for the purpose of supplying their basic requirements.  Now it is increasingly possible and desirable for individuals to buy real estate as an investment, a wealth creator, and a depository of value that can effectively convert the results of their properly directed work efforts into a tangible, profitable asset.

 

A real estate investment can be described as the commitment  of financial resources  for the purpose of preserving and increasing capital and earning a profit.  Most everybody makes investments of various kinds throughout their lives.  We put our time, energy and money into educating ourselves and our children, buying cars, obtaining health care, accumulating savings and pursuing other ventures in search of gaining a better quality of life.

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       Frequently, making an investment also involves the setting aside for a time some present comforts in anticipation of earning future benefits.  Forgoing instant gratification, while unpleasant, often is necessary in order to sufficiently accumulate the savings needed to acquire real estate property.  Moreover, money isn’t the only component typically applied to a real estate investment.  One’s time and effort,, referred to as sweat equity, can also be very much involved.

 

Yes, the resources necessary to reap the intended rewards from real estate investing in terms of money, time and effort must be budgeted and planned in advance, for they surely will be over and above what are needed for securing one’s life necessities.  However, those rewards can be substantial, indeed.  To best optimize the use of one’s limited resources when investing in real estate, I highly recommend that one acquire and carefully apply the expert instruction included in an essential how-to guide like Real Estate Investing available from http://www.jujamvideoreview.com/realestateinvesting.html.  Be sure to check it out! 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      

    Property, of course, is anything and everything that can be owned.  Real estate property, explicitly, is defined as land and all of the geological and man-made developments that are permanently affiliatrd and affixed to it. This includes not only the ground itself and all that is connected to it, but the air above it and the minerals below it as well as all rights associated therewith.  All property not classified as real estate is personal property.

With the ownership of real estate comes not only the possession of the physical  property and the attributes that define it, but also the procurement of certain legal rights to continuously enjoy the peaceful use and redistribution of it.  What that means is that when we acquire ownership of real estate property, we also earn an accompanying bundle of claims on the property.  These rights relate to the use, possession, control, enjoyment, exclusion, and distribution of the property, including the right to pass ownership along by way of a will.  Together, these rights change the definition of real estate to real property.

Over the course of time, the ownership and control of real estate has very much become a fundamental part of our lives.  We rely on real property to feed, clothe and provide us with shelter.  In the United States and other highly developed countries,  these basic needs are met in a variety of ways.  As a result of the many technological inventions that have advanced our living standards, people are no longer directly dependent on owning land to meet their essential needs.  Instead, we rent or own apartments or houses that are serviced by utility companies and financed by lending institutions.  We work in office buildings, manufacturing plants and  shops and purchase the products and services we need from stores, play in parks and consume the meat and produce that comes to us from distant farms and ranches.

Many people now have the financial means to proceed beyond the use of real estate for the purpose of supplying their basic requirements.  Now it is increasingly possible and desirable for individuals to buy real estate as an investment, a wealth creator, and a depository of value that can effectively convert the results of their properly directed work efforts into a tangible, profitable asset.

A real estate investment can be described as the commitment  of financial resources  for the purpose of preserving and increasing capital and earning a profit.  Most everybody makes investments of various kinds throughout their lives.  We put our time, energy and money into educating ourselves and our children, buying cars, obtaining health care, accumulating savings and pursuing other ventures in search of gaining a better quality of life.

Frequently, making an investment also involves the setting aside for a time some present comforts in anticipation of earning future benefits.  Forgoing instant gratification, while unpleasant, often is necessary in order to sufficiently accumulate the savings needed to acquire real estate property.  Moreover, money isn’t the only component typically applied to a real estate investment.  One’s time and effort,, referred to as sweat equity, can also be very much involved.

Yes, the resources necessary to reap the intended rewards from real estate investing in terms of money, time and effort must be budgeted and planned in advance, for they surely will be over and above what are needed for securing one’s life necessities.  However, those rewards can be substantial, indeed.  To best optimize the use of one’s limited resources when investing in real estate, I enthusiastically recommend that one acquire and carefully apply the expert instruction included in an essential how-to guide like Real Estate Investing available from http://www.jujamvideoreview.com/realestateinvesting.html.  Be sure to check it out! 

     

      

          James Nelson has accumulated almost 40 years of successful business experience, and much of it has been based on the maxim, “Do what you do do well, then find others who can do the rest best!”   He is currently President of JuJam Enterprises Incorporated where they focus on “Helping People Help Themselves.”  You can learn more about “Real Estate Investing” on their website, http://www.JuJamVideoReview.com/realestateinvesting.html.  Previously, together with his wife, Judy, he owned and operated Lakewood Lodge, a family recreation resort in northern Minnesota.  Prior to that he completed 23 years in various sales and marketing management positions at AT&T.  He earned a Bachelor of Science (Business) degree from the University of Minnesota with Distinction in 1975.  Before attending college under the GI Bill, he served 10 years in the U.S. Navy.

ProAPOD Print Preview Modified

ProAPOD has modified the Print Preview function to correct an issue encountered in Microsoft Vista and Windows 7. All three of our solutions were updated: Real Estate Agent 6.0, Real Estate Investor 4.0, and Real Estate Executive 10.0.

The correction was necessitated by the way Vista and Windows 7 handles its ribbons (XP and older versions worked fine). The problem was that when Print Preview was opened, there was no clear way to close the preview window. With this correction, the preview window now displays a Close button. You might notice a very slight flicker when opening and closing the preview window but it couldn’t be avoided. This only applies to Print Preview, however, all the other commands are not affected. Besides, the flicker is quite minor.

You can obtain your update simply by logging to your account and clicking the Update button.

As always, though the updated software was tested on both Windows XP (Excel 2003) and Windows 7 (Excel 2010), please report any issues if you encounter them.

Thank for choosing ProAPOD.

Know The Answers To Real Estate Investing Faq And Get Success

Know The Answers To Real Estate Investing Faq And Get Success

Creating a goal plan is half the fun of beginning real estate investing. It’s all about starts at the end, when you are beginning a real estate investing remember to begin with the end in mind, as you start down the path to beginning real estate investing. What kind of lifestyle you would like to have, how much time you want to put in, and where and how you want to live. What you would like your real estate investing activities to provide for you, Spend some time thinking about exactly what you want to accomplish. Don’t think only in financial terms. Be specific, and write down your goals. When you can see them clearly in your imagination, you’re well on your way to achieving them.

In real estate investing goal setting step has fail to notice in short interval, this is very unfortunate because taking a few moments to complete this simple task effectively can have a huge impact on your long term results but also on how seriously you are treated by professionals. A great way to describe creative real estate investing is to describe what it is not, here are examples of what it is and isn’t. Real Estate has classified in five types they are Flipping real estate, Probate real estate investing, Virtual real estate investing, Lease option real estate investing: Part I is Lease option real estate investing and Part II is Flipping real estate. Flipping real estate is one of the most used terms in real estate investing. The term flipping real estate means different things to different people depending upon who you are.

Probate real estate: Motivated seller, an unemotional is one of the great benefits of probate real estate investing. This benefit is usually from out of town, but not familiar with the property and therefore not emotionally attached to it. Virtual real estate investing: There is many an elaborate and systematic plan of action such as virtual real estate investing, it is an ideal virtual real estate investing system would allow you to work and never leave your house. For example leads are automatically generated through automated e-mails, websites and direct mail, which are directed to a prerecorded message and or answering service.

Lease option real estate investing Part One: Now a day investing real techniques are accessible which creates multiple rewards by combining techniques. Lease option real estate investing Part Two :If your are beginning real estate investor making money by doubling cash flows is slam dunk. It gives you what ever you wanted.

The most often asked questions by new or aspiring real estate investors have to do with beginning real estate investing. You would want to read this to learn some specifics associated with real estate investing if you are an avid goal setter, if not a frequent goal setter please read on and consider that setting goals which are really a powerful tool. It does have some magic about it, and is critical to you to become successful in real estate investor.

Bill Ross, a real estate investor and business partner in association with Rob Minton, owns the website http://exclusivewealthsystems.com/ifl. He helps people to create financial freedom by education in real estate investing through the ‘homes buying homes strategy’.

Related Real Estate Investing Articles

Commercial Real Estate Financing

Commercial Real Estate Financing

Commercial real estate financing can be a complicated matter, but it doesn’t have to be so long as the borrower does enough research beforehand. Sources for this type of financing include saving and loan institutions, mortgage banking firms, insurance companies, regional banks and private investors.

The terms for commercial real estate financing depend upon many different factors such as what the market conditions are at the time. The lender must take into consideration the types of risks that are inherent in each transaction and what the intended use is for the property. Both parties should consider the anticipated returns from the property as well as its location. A great business in a bad neighborhood is, in most cases, not a good investment. The lender, as well as its size will consider the type of real estate being borrowed upon carefully.

Each one of these considerations is important and must be examined by the prospective business owner before applying for commercial real estate financing.

Some lenders narrow their services to one specific type of commercial investments. These might include retail operations warehouses or multifamily dwellings. Other lenders provide financing across-the-board for all types of commercial ventures. The key to beginning the whole financing process for the business owner is to have all of the paperwork competed and in order prior to approaching the lender. The bottom line is that lenders are most concerned about their risks. The borrower who has every base covered by clear and concise documentation will stand the better chance of being seriously considered for financing.

Before making a decision about whether or not to venture into a particular real estate financing situation, the lender will want to see expense and income statements for the property in question. They will check to see if it demonstrates a solid income stream. They will want to know all about the management team, so their complete profiles should be prepared and ready to present. Anyone who is involved as an owner of the property will have to provide financial statements. The property will have to have been appraised and the written appraisal presented at the meeting between borrower and lender. If construction blueprints are available, those should also be presented to the lender.

If the borrower does the necessary research and homework and has all of the required paperwork prepared and ready to present during the initial meeting, much of the red tape can be eliminated right away.

To know more about Commercial Real Estate Financing and Commercial Bridge Loans visit CommercialRealEstateMortgageLenders.com